World Parkinson’s Day

World Parkinson’s Day

Health Weeks

30-03-2018

Currently there is no known cause of Parkinson’s or understanding of why some people develop Parkinson’s and not others. This is the reason Parkinson’s is often referred to as “Idiopathic (cause unknown) Parkinson’s.

There are many theories as to the causes of Parkinson’s and it is generally thought that multiple factors are responsible. 

 

Through research, our understanding of the possible causes of Parkinson’s is increasing all of the time. Areas of current research include: ageing, genes, environmental factors, chemical exposure and virus like structures called prions. 

GENES AND PARKINSON’S

Genetic, or hereditary, Parkinson’s where Parkinson’s is passed on from one generation to the next is rare, only a very small percentage of Parkinson’s may have a direct genetic cause. Read More >

Smart Eating Week – the taste of the future!

Smart Eating Week – the taste of the future!

Health Weeks

07-02-2018

 

The week is run by Accredited Practising Dietitians, and supported by the Dietitians Association of Australia. Smart Eating Week falls at an ideal time, with the start of a New Year inspiring many of us to live healthier lives, including through smart eating.

 

And let’s face it, when it comes to smart eating, there are many ways to achieve this – as everyone is different. Read More >

Afternoon Teal – Ovarian Cancer Australia

Afternoon Teal – Ovarian Cancer Australia

Health Weeks

10-01-2018

We are calling on all Australians to help Ovarian Cancer Australia reduce the impact of ovarian cancer and improve the outcomes for women and their families living with this insidious disease. By hosting an Afternoon Teal event, you are helping your loved ones know the signs and symptoms of the disease and know their family history.

Our Afternoon Teal campaign encourages people to host a fundraising event for their friends, family or colleagues. Whether it’s a high tea, picnic, golf day, movie night or gala dinner, anybody and everybody can get involved! Read More >

Big Red BBQ and Kidney Health

Big Red BBQ and Kidney Health

Health Weeks

01-01-2018

Looking to make a difference this year? Consider hosting your very own Big Red BBQ in support of Kidney Health Australia.

You can hold your Big Red BBQ anywhere at any time. Have one with your family and friends at home, host one at work and invite your colleagues, go to a park with your neighbours, arrange one at a community function centre or your local church, school or uni. The possibilities are endless. All we ask is that you turn it RED and have fun along the way! Read More >

Grow a beard in Decembeard

Grow a beard in Decembeard

Health Weeks

06-12-2017

 

Bowel cancer and men – the facts

1 in 11 Australian men will develop bowel cancer in their lifetime.

Bowel cancer affects men of all ages – and risk increases every year from age 50.

Around 55% of all Australians diagnosed with bowel cancer are men.

Choices you make related to diet, lifestyle, screening and surveillance can influence your bowel cancer risk.

Because you can change or modify these risk factors, they are referred to as ‘modifiable’.

Increased age, personal and family health history and hereditary conditions can also influence your bowel cancer risk.

Because you cannot change these risk factors, they are referred to as ‘non-modifiable’. Read More >

International Day of People with Disability

International Day of People with Disability

Health Weeks

22-11-2017

In Australia, 18.6% of females and 18% of males have disability.

Disability covers many areas and often the term is misunderstood.

‘Disability’ is an umbrella term covering impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions. A person may also be seen to be ‘with disability’ if he or she has had impairment in the past, or based on a personal or group standard or norm. One in five, or more than 4 million Australians, have some form of disability. In Australia 18.6% of females and 18% of males have a disability. Read More >

Sense in the Sun

Sense in the Sun

Health Weeks

15-11-2017

In Australia each year more than 2,000 people die of skin cancer.

 During National Skin Cancer Action Week 2017 (19–25 November) let’s remember to protect ourselves and our family from sun damage.

Skin cancer is common in Australia. Approximately two-thirds of Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by the age of 70. In 2017, it is estimated that 13,941 new cases of melanoma skin cancer will be diagnosed. As summer approaches, these statistics should serve as a wake-up call to all Australians about the importance of sun protection. Read More >

World Antibiotic Awareness Week, 13-19 November 2017

World Antibiotic Awareness Week, 13-19 November 2017

Health Weeks

06-11-2017

Colds are caused by viruses. When you have a cold, you may sneeze, have a blocked or runny nose, a sore throat and a cough. Colds can make you feel unwell but rarely cause serious harm. Colds usually get better in 7–10 days, but the cough can last up to three weeks.

Influenza, or ‘the flu’, is different to a cold although both are caused by viruses. Flu symptoms usually start suddenly with a high fever and you may feel unwell and need to rest. You may have a dry cough, shivering, sweating and severe muscle aches. Antibiotics are medicines used to treat bacterial infections and diseases; they do not work against viruses.

In Antibiotic Awareness Week 13-19 November, 2017 you can read about viruses, bacteria, protection against influenza, self-care for colds and flu, when to use antibiotics, possible side effects of antibiotics and the overuse of antibiotics. Remember to always seek advice from a qualified healthcare professional before taking antibiotics.

Australian Food Safety Week

Australian Food Safety Week

Health Weeks

26-10-2017

The theme of Australian Food Safety Week, to be held from 11 to 18 November 2017, is ‘Is it done yet? Using a thermometer to check if your food is cooked safely’.

Food Safety Information Council Chair, Rachelle Williams, said the Council was focusing on the priority of the Australian and New Zealand Food Ministerial Forum to reduce foodborne illness, particularly the escalating rates of Campylobacter and Salmonella infection in Australia.

‘Each year an estimated 4.1 million people get food poisoning in Australia, 1 million Australians have to visit a doctor with food poisoning, 32,000 people end up in hospital and 86 people die,’ Ms Williams said.

‘Australian Food Safety Week is the major activity of the Food Safety Information Council and plays a vital role in reducing the cases of food poisoning in the Australia community. Educating people to purchase a food thermometer for their home kitchen and to learn how to use it correctly to cook food safely will contribute to a reduction in food poisoning.

Visit www.foodsafety.asn.au for more information.